Resources

our hand-picked resources and personal recommendations

 
 
Start socialisation at 8 weeks of age, before pup has completed its inoculations, by carrying it outside every day to meet people, and see / hear traffic and other dogs.

Start socialisation at 8 weeks of age, before pup has completed its inoculations, by carrying it outside every day to meet people, and see / hear traffic and other dogs.

dogs trust / kc puppyplan - an owner’s guide to socialisation (from 8 weeks)

All animals are scared of new things and this self-preservation instinct keeps them safe from predators / unsafe situations. For pet dogs, the window of opportunity for socialisation closes early - around 14 weeks - so start to socialise your puppy within a few days of it arriving home.

Many behaviour problems (aggression, noise phobias, separation anxieties, fearfulness etc) can be prevented through good socialisation so go to the FREE Puppyplan and start to plan your pup’s experiences!


DOGS TRUST NOISE FILES

Dogs that are safely and gradually exposed to loud noises during their essential socialisation period are often able to cope more effectively with novel, frightening sounds like fireworks or loud engine noises.

These free downloads created by the Dogs Trust, and the corresponding how-to-guides, contain a collection of noises that all puppies need to get used to, including domestic noises, traffic, fireworks and thunder.


Look through the  Dogs Trust list  to check what potentially toxic plants or chemicals you have in your home.

Look through the Dogs Trust list to check what potentially toxic plants or chemicals you have in your home.

DOGS TRUST LIST OF POISONOUS PLANTS, GARDEN AND HOUSEHOLD SUBSTANCES

Many common garden and house plants can be toxic to dogs, especially puppies. Chemicals used in the garden (such as slug pellets) and human medications may also contain toxic substances.

The actual toxicity depends upon both the amount ingested, and the weight / age of the dog. Once it has been ingested it is absorbed into the blood stream and travels around the body where it can cause fatal damage to vulnerable organs.

If your dog eats something it shouldn’t, call your vet immediately for advice as often dogs need to be given an injection to make them vomit up the poison within 30min of it being ingested.